CyberLink Exchange
This Site is a member of CyberLink Exchange

 

The Plot of Thomas Edison's Frankenstein


Taken from the Original Kinetogram
March 15, 1910

"Frankenstein" is considered by nearly all readers of fiction the most harrowing tale that has ever been placed in the field of literature, but strange to say it was created in the spirit of amusement. Lord Byron, Mr. and Mrs. Shelley and one other author who's name we do not know, were stopping at Geneva, and in order to pass away the time each in turn agreed to write a story of some gruesome, ghastly subject. Of the four that were written Mrs. Shelley's alone remains to be handed down as a work of art. The creation of the Frankenstein monster slowly grew in Mrs. Shelley's mind, possibly much the same as it developed in the character of Frankenstein himself. As a story that reaches the climax of horror and awful suggestion this work stands alone.

In making the film the Edison Company has carefully tried to eliminate all the actually repulsive situations and to concentrate its endeavors upon the mystic and psychological problems that are to be found in this weird tale. Wherever, therefore, the film differs from the original story it is purely with the idea of eliminating what would be repulsive to a moving picture audience.

The story of Frankenstein as depicted in the film runs as follows:

Frankenstein, a young student, is seen bidding his sweetheart and farther goodbye, as he is leaving home to enter a college in order to study the sciences. Shortly after his arrival at college he becomes absorbed in the mysteries of life and death to the extent of forgetting practically everything else. His great ambition is to create a human being, and finally one night his dream is realized. He is convinced that he has found a way to create the most perfect human being that the world has ever seen. We see his experiment commence and the development of it. To Frankenstein's horror, instead of creating a marvel of physical beauty and grace, there is unfolded before his eyes and before the audience an awful, ghastly, abhorrent monster. As he realizes what he has done Frankenstein rushes from the room, only to have the misshapen monster peer at him through the curtains of his bed. He falls fainting to the floor, where he is found by his servant, who revives him.

After a few weeks illness he returns home, a broken, weary man, but under the loving care of father and sweetheart he regains his health and strength and begins to take a less morbid view of life. In other words, the story of the film brings out the fact that the creation of the monster was only possible because Frankenstein had allowed his normal mind to be overcome by evil and unnatural thoughts. His marriage is soon to take place. But one evening while sitting in his library, he chances to glance in the mirror before him and sees the reflection of the monster which has just opened the door of his room. All the terror of the past comes over him and, fearing lest his sweetheart should learn the truth, he bids the monster conceal himself behind the curtain while he hurriedly induces his sweetheart, who then comes in, to stay only a moment. Then follows a strong, dramatic scene. The monster, who is following his creator with the devotion of a dog, is insanely jealous of anyone else. He snatches from Frankenstein's coat the rose which his sweetheart has given him, and in the struggle throws Frankenstein to the floor. Here the monster looks up and for the first time confronts his own reflection in the mirror. Appalled and horrified at his own image he flees in terror from the room. Not being able, however, to live apart from his creator, he again comes to the house on the wedding night and, searching for the cause of his jealousy, goes into the bride's room. Frankenstein coming into the main room hears a shriek of terror, which is followed by a moment after by his bride rushing in and falling in a faint at his feet. The monster then enters and after overpowering Frankenstein's feeble efforts by a slight exercise of his gigantic strength leaves the house.

Here comes the point which we have endeavored to bring out, namely; That when Frankenstein's love for his bride shall have attained full strength and freedom from impurity it will have such an effect upon his mind that the monster cannot exist. This theory is clearly demonstrated in the next and closing scene, which has probably never been surpassed in anything shown on the moving picture screen. The monster, broken down by his unsuccessful attempts to be with his creator, enters the room, stands before a large mirror and holds out his arms entreatingly. Gradually the real monster fades away, leaving on the image in the mirror. A moment later Frankenstein himself enters. As he stands directly before the mirror we are amazed to see the image of the monster reflected instead of Frankenstein's own. Gradually, however, under the effect of love and his better nature, the monster's image fades and Frankenstein sees himself in his young manhood in the mirror. his bride joining him, and the film ends with their embrace, Frankenstein's mind now being relieved of the awful horror and weight it has been laboring under for so long.

To those who are familiar with Mrs. Shelley's story it will be evident that we have carefully omitted anything which might by any possibility shock any portion of an audience. To those who are not familiar with the story we can only say that the film tells an intensely dramatic story by the aid of some of the most remarkable photographic effects that have yet been attempted. The formation of the hideous monster from the blazing chemicals of a huge caldron in Frankenstein's laboratory is probably the most weird, mystifying and fascinating scene ever shown on a film.



FRANKENSTEIN, 1910

NOSFERATU, 1922
Enter our Discussion Room
If you DARE!


Discuss movies, monsters, film
collecting & more!
  • Nosferatu Film Stills
  • Bram Stoker
  • Nosferatu - The Cast
  • Nosferatu - The Plot
  • Cinema's First Monsters
  • Commemorative Edition
If you experience any difficulties using the order form or any pages on this site please click here!

LRS Marketing - Internet Marketing Specialists
Site Designed & Hosted by LRS Marketing
mailto:lrsmarke@lrsmarketing.com
Copyright 1998 [LRS Marketing]. All rights reserved.
Revised: November 05, 1999